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Tuesday 19 March 2019  |   | 

Programs

Course Descriptions

​​CME 111 Logic Design Fundamentals

Credits: 4(3,1,2)            Prerequisite: None         

This course introduces digital systems design concepts. Topics include basic combinational building blocks and design methods to construct synchronous digital systems; alternative representations for digital systems; standard logic (SSI, MSI) vs. programmable logic (PLD, FPGA); finite state machine design; digital computer building blocks as case studies; introduction to computer-aided design software in VHDL. The course also includes a design project.


CME 112 Electric Circuit and Electronics

Credits: 4 (3,1,2)    Prerequisite: PHYS 205     

This course is an introduction to Electric Circuit and Electronics.  It enables the student to understand the basic components and operations of DC and AC electrical circuits as well as the design and the analysis of basic circuits. Also, it would introduce the students to the concept of circuit transformation and steady-state analysis of electrical circuits. In addition, the course covers the basic characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits.


CME 211 Communication Embedded Systems

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)       Prerequisite: CME 111

The course will focus primarily on basic embedded system concepts and the student will learn the basics of designing, interfacing, configuring, and programming embedded systems. One of the popular microcontrollers is selected to implement the techniques learned in class. By the end of the course, the student will have mastered the basics of embedded system design and programming.


CME 241 Signals and Systems

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)           Prerequisite: MATH 113

This course covers basic concepts and methods related to continuous and discrete-time signals and systems. The course includes signals and systems and their properties, linear time-invariant systems, stability analysis, a sampling of continuous-time signals, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform, time and frequency domain representations of discrete-time signals and systems, and introductory concepts in communications.


CME 242 Communication Engineering Fundamentals

Credits: 4 (3,1,2)       Corequisite: CME 241

This course provides an introduction to electronic devices and circuits used in communication systems. Examples include different types of transistors, amplifiers, oscillators, mixer, filters, and phase locked loop with exploring their applications in communication systems.


CME 243 Electromagnetics I

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)    Prerequisite: PHYS 205, MATH 215

This course covers the fundamentals of applied electromagnetic by emphasizing physical understanding and practical applications in Electrical and Computer Engineering systems. It deals with the study of static electric fields in vacuum and dielectrics, conductors, capacitance, electrostatic energy, and forces.


CME 321 Networking: Principles, Protocols, and Architecture

Credits: 4 (3, 1, 2)    Prerequisite: CME 111, CME 241       

An Introduction course that outlines network architecture and protocols, layering, OSI and TCP/IP models. Physical layer: transmission media, data encoding, asynchronous and synchronous transmission. Data link layer: error detection, flow control, error control. Packet Switching: datagrams, virtual circuits, routing, congestion control, internetworking. Local area networks, network layer, and transport layer.


CME 322 Network Analysis and Design

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)       Prerequisite: CME 321             

A course that outlines LAN standards & Devices:  Ethernet and IEEE standards for LANs; LAN devices: Bridges, HUBs, and Ethernet Switches. Network Layer Services: Datagram and Virtual Circuits, Introduction to ATM. Network Layer Protocols: Optimality Principle, Routing Algorithms: Flow-based, Distance Vector, Shortest Path, Broadcast Congestion Control Algorithms:  Leaky Bucket, Traffic Shaping, Congestion Control in ATM.


CME 341 Electromagnetics II

Credits: 3  (3,1,0)        Prerequisite: MATH 225, CME 243

This course covers the Poisson’s equation, static magnetic fields, Biot-Savart law, Ampere’s law, vector magnetic potential, inductance, Maxwell’s equations for time-varying fields, Faraday’s law, plane wave propagation, time-harmonic fields, propagation in lossless media, and wave reflection and transmission at normal incidence. The bridge between electric circuits and electromagnetic is done through the study of transmission lines and their lumped-element model, transmission line input impedance, and power flow on the lossless transmission line.


CME 342 Communication Theory

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)        Prerequisite: STAT 101, CME 241

This course covers the fundamental principles underlying the analysis and design of digital communication systems. We introduce the fundamental probability concepts that are used during the course. We discuss the processes of sampling, quantization, and digital pulse modulation including pulse code modulation, pulse differential modulation, and delta modulation. We also cover the digital base-band transmission by focusing on the effects of channel noise and band-limited channel bandwidth on the performance of a system. In addition, we deal with the data detection problem of digital signals through the concept of matched and correlation filters.   

 

CME 343 Communication Systems I

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)      Prerequisite: CME 242

This course focuses on continuous-wave modulation, which is the basic operation of analog communication systems. It gives the student an insight and understanding of signals classifications, noise, Fourier series, Fourier transform, spectrum analysis, and explores their applications in the context of analog communication systems. We cover thoroughly the generation and reception of double-sideband, single side-band, vestigial side-band, angle modulation signals

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CME 344 Antennas and Propagation

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)     Prerequisite: CME 341             

This course provide the students with an understanding of the basic principles of Antenna Analysis and Design, an overview of the fundamental characteristics and parameters of antennas, an overview of analytical and numerical methods used to analyze and design antennas with application to some basic antenna structures such as linear antennas, loop antennas, and antenna arrays.


CME 421 Internet Engineering and Web Programming

Credits: 2 (2, 1, 2)           Prerequisite: CS 210, CME 321

This course covers the fundamentals of major protocols on the internet, new technologies introduced on the internet and quality of service, routing on the internet, network security and firewall design as well as application protocols. Major techniques used in Web servers also will be covered and programming and maintenance of Web, firewalls and proxy servers.

CME 441 Communication Systems II

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)     Prerequisite: CME 342

The course provides a solid grounding in the details of telecommunications technology. Different wire and wireless communication systems are covered such as telephony, analog and digital television (TV), satellite, optical fiber, and radar communication systems.  


CME 442 Information and Coding Theory

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)      Prerequisite:  CME 342   

This course addresses the problem of design efficient and reliable communication systems through introducing the field of information theory. Source and channel coding which are important elements of information theory are essential for any communication systems. We cover the mathematical preliminaries related to these elements, such as entropy, relative entropy, and mutual information and show how they arise as natural answers to questions of data compression, channel capacity, and error correction. We also study different source and channel codes, such as Huffman, arithmetic, block, cyclic, and convolution codes.   


CME 451 Wireless Communication

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)    Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

A course that covers the fundamentals of wireless communications with an emphasis on wireless channel modeling; digital modulation in wireless channels; diversity techniques; multiple access techniques; multicarrier transmission, multiple antenna systems,  the cellular concept; overview of current wireless communications systems.


CME 452 Mobile Communication

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)    Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

A course on the evolution of cellular technologies; GSM network architecture is explored in details. Multiple access techniques, CDMA, and WCDMA are provided. 2G, 3G, and 4G  mobile cellular systems are highlighted and explored and UMTS 3G is emphasized in the course. New technology: Long Term Evolution (LTE) which is a required technology in cellular systems today is comprehensively explored.


CME 453 Microwave Communication

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)   Prerequisites: Senior Level Standing

The course focuses on the analysis and design of high-frequency electronic circuits, with emphasis on RF and microwave circuits and components for communication systems. The course covers the basic principles of radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits design, as applied to the design of microstrip and coplanar lines, impedance transformers, low-pass and band-pass filters, directional couplers, power dividers, amplifiers, mixers, and diode detectors. It provides an understanding of S-parameters and signal-flow graph analysis techniques. The course enables the student to get hands-on experience in RF and microwave circuit design through the use of computer-aided design tools to simulate and analyze high-frequency circuits, build them as part of a course project, and perform measurements in the lab using network and spectrum analyzers.


CME 454 Satellite Communication

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)        Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course is designed to provide students with a global view of satellite systems, its missions, launch systems, frequency allocation and orbits specification, the link budget calculation for both the uplink, and the downlink, the communication system of the satellite and earth stations, satellite access, and satellite services. Satellite cross-links, VSAT, and mobile satellite systems.


CME 455 Cellular Networks

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)          Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course features a comprehensive study of system performance. Covers all the major features such as basic QoS of voice, data and multimedia applications in GSM, GPRS, EDGE, CDMA, W-CDMA/UMTS and AMR and the full capability of the GERAN radio interface for 3G service support is envisaged. Different 3G technologies and the position of GERAN, CDMA, and W-CDMA/UMTS within such technologies will be discussed.


CME 459 Special Topics in Communications Engineering

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)          Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing,

This course is a 3 credit hour course that is meant to introduce new emerging subjects or issues in Communications Engineering. Such a course can be offered a few times under the same theme and same number, and if approved by the department it can be given a fixed number with a name that reflects the theme.   

 

CME 458 Undergraduate Research in Communication

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)    Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing Cumulative average of 3.0 or above, Approval of faculty member supervising the research, and Approval of the CME Undergraduate Committee.

Undergraduate Research is an opportunity for an undergraduate student to obtain research experience, and is recommended for those students wishing to do research or otherwise go beyond what is required in normal classes. Often these experiences lead to further research, to graduate school projects, and theses. Students may participate, under the supervision of a faculty member, in a research project. Before registering in CME 458, the student must submit a proposal for approval by the supervising faculty member and the CME Undergraduate Committee, regarding the nature of the research, specific goals, and final report.  Students taking CME 458 are expected to: Attend a weekly individual research meeting with the faculty member supervising the research. Work the equivalent of twelve hours per week in a laboratory. For theoretical research, no laboratory work might be necessary; however, an equivalent amount of work is expected. Present a project report to receive a numerical course grade. The University Libraries and laboratories are available to obtain research materials. If the subject matter of the Undergraduate Research course is relevant to the final year project of the student, the committee evaluating the Senior Project will take the work done into consideration in its evaluation of the Senior Project of the student.


CME 431 Wireless Sensor Networks

Credits: 3(3,0,0)           Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course will introduce students to the state of the art in wireless sensor networks. We will have a significant reading list from recent literature to accompany the lectures. Each lecture itself will present one realization of each sensor network concept, which will be followed by a broader class discussion on the topic based on its reading list. In several cases, lectures will emphasize aspects of fault-tolerance, reliability, and security. Case studies from existing applications will be used. Each student will have to complete a project. Students will be expected to prepare and present a poster to describe their findings.


CME 432 Internet Security

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)    Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the field of network security, security risks and countermeasures associated with network connectivity. Students will gain knowledge and skills to understand, apply and manage network security. Students will be aware of the various activities designed to protect network data that include protecting the usability, reliability, integrity, and safety of network and data.


CME 433 Mobile Ad-Hoc and Sensor Networks

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)    Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course covers all aspects of ad hoc and sensor networking, from design through performance issues to application requirements. The course starts with the design issues and challenges that are associated with implementations of ad hoc and sensor network applications. This includes dealing with mobility, disconnections, and awareness of battery power consumption. The course then provides a detailed treatment of proactive, reactive, and hybrid routing protocols, in addition to the various clustering approaches. Next, it covers the IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN and Bluetooth standards and discusses their characteristics and operations. The course also discusses research topics that involve collaboration among mobile devices, service discovery, and data caching. Through a project, the course gives students hands-on experience in designing a mobile ad hoc network using available Pocket PCs and simulation tools.

CME 434 Cryptography and Network Security

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)          Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course covers principles and practice of cryptography and network security: classical systems, symmetric block ciphers (DES, AES, other contemporary symmetric ciphers), linear and differential cryptanalysis, perfect secrecy, public-key cryptography (RSA, discrete logarithms), algorithms for factoring and discrete logarithms, cryptographic protocols, hash functions, authentication, key management, key exchange, signature schemes, email and web security, viruses, firewalls, digital right management, and other topics.


CME 438 Undergraduate Research in Networking

Credits: 3 (3,0,0) Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing, Cumulative average of 3.0 or above,               Approval of faculty member supervising the research, and Approval of the CME Undergraduate Committee  

Undergraduate Research is an opportunity for an undergraduate student to obtain research experience, and is recommended for those students wishing to do research or otherwise go beyond what is required in normal classes. Often these experiences lead to further research, to graduate school projects, and theses. Students may participate, under the supervision of a faculty member, in a research project. Before registering in CME 438, the student must submit a proposal for approval by the supervising faculty member and the CME Undergraduate Committee, regarding the nature of the research, specific goals, and final report.  The prerequisites for CME 438 are: Students taking CME 438 are expected to: Attend a weekly individual research meeting with the faculty member supervising the research. Work the equivalent of twelve hours per week in a laboratory. For theoretical research, no laboratory work might be necessary; however, an equivalent amount of work is expected. Present a project report to receive a numerical course grade. The University Libraries and laboratories are available to obtain research materials. If the subject matter of the Undergraduate Research course is relevant to the final year project of the student, the committee evaluating the Senior Project will take the work done into consideration in its evaluation of the Senior Project of the student.


CME 439 Special Topics in Networks Engineering

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)     Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing,

This course is a 3 credit hour course that is meant to introduce new emerging subjects or issues in Networks Engineering. Such a course can be offered a few times under the same theme and same number, and if approved by the department it can be given a fixed number with a name that reflects the theme.    


CME 490 Internship

Credits: 3 (0,0,0)      Prerequisite: Completion of 90 Credit hours.

This is an eight-week professional training course in Engineering Management. The program combines classroom learning with work experience to assist students in applying their knowledge and skills to real-life situations and enable our students to create a future quality career in response to the evolving of local economic and workforce development needs. Students are expected to prepare and present a report of their work experience.


CME 492 CO-OP

Credits: 10        Prerequisite: Completion of 90 Credit hours.

The PSU COOP Education Program combines classroom learning with work experience to assist students in applying their knowledge and skills to real life situations & building strong partnerships between the PSU and the local business community, as well as enable our students to create future quality career in response to the evolving of local economic and workforce development needs.


CME 498 Senior Project I

Credits: 1 (0,2,0)  Prerequisite: ENGL 301, Senior Level Standing

A supervised project in groups of normally 3 students aimed at providing practical experience in some aspects of communications and networks engineering. Students are expected to define the project, state its objectives, complete a literature survey, set project specifications and select a design method. They are also expected to do some preliminary modeling and analysis and to acquire the necessary material needed for the completion of the project in the spring term. A professional report and an oral presentation are also required from the students.​


CME 499 Senior Project II

Credits: 3 (0,3,0)         Prerequisite: CME 498

This is a continuation of Project I. Students are asked to deliver a product that has passed through the design, analysis, testing and evaluation stages. The course also requires the production of a professional report that includes a description of the design process, implementation and testing, verification and validation and a critical appraisal of the project. An oral presentation and a poster are also within the project deliverables.