EM 101         ENGINEERING DRAWING

Credits: 2 (0,0,6)            Prerequisite:     None

This course trains students on the graphical interpretation of orthographic projection to include auxiliary views, section views, dimensioning, translation of design instructions into detail and assembly drawings, drawing conventions including weldments, piping, referencing and surface finish notation, election of tolerances based on design requirements.

 

EM 203         STATICS

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)            Prerequisites:   MATH 113, PHYS 105, EM 101

An introduction to the analysis and solution of engineering design problems related to particles and rigid bodies in equilibrium. Primary concepts include the concepts of force systems; vector analysis, moments and couples in 2D and 3D; equilibrium of force systems; analysis of structures; plan trusses and frames; distributed force system; centroids and composite bodies; area moments of inertia; analysis of beams; and friction.

 

EM 204         STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisite:     EM 203

This course tackles the fundamentals of properties of structural materials. The following topics are examined: definitions of stress and strain; stress, strain, and deformation of axially loaded bars and torsionally loaded shafts; distributed loads; statically indeterminate problems; stress and strain components and transformations and Mohr's circle; pressure vessels; linear elastic constitutive equations; shear and moment diagrams; bending and transverse shear stress; combined loading; beam deflection; and column buckling. Laboratory experiments are associated with the lectures.

 

EM 205         THERMODYNAMICS

Credits:  3 (3,1,0)           Prerequisites:   PHYS 105, MATH 113

This course introduces students to thermodynamics. Elements covers include: system and control volume concepts; properties of a pure substance; work and heat; the first law of thermodynamics as applied to a system and a control volume, internal energy, enthalpy; the second law of thermodynamics; Carnot cycle, entropy, reversible and irreversible processes; applications of steady-state steady-flow, uniform-state uniform-flow, and other processes.

 

 

EM 206         MATERIALS SCIENCE

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisites:   CHEM 101, PHYS 105

The course covers a broad range of engineering materials: mechanical, electrical and chemical; fundamentals of crystallography; impurities and imperfections in solids; atomic diffusion; single phase metals and alloys; elastic and plastic deformation, recrystallization and grain growth; multi-phase materials; phase diagrams with emphasis on iron-iron carbide system; heat treatment process, such as annealing, normalizing and quenching; studies of widely used engineering materials: steels, plastics, ceramics, concrete and wood; in addition to fundamentals of metallurgy and alloys.

 

EM 208         FLUID MECHANICS

Credits: 3 (3,1,0) Prerequisite:                EM 205

The course canvasses the basics of fluid mechanics. Topics include fluid properties, statics, forces on plane and curve surfaces, kinematics of fluid motion, integral and differential representation of conservation of mass, balance of linear and angular momentum, the first law of thermo- dynamics, continuity equation, Bernoulli's equation, energy principle, dimensional analysis, and elementary viscous flow. Frictional losses, simple pipeline analysis and steady channel flow are also covered.

 

EM 301         SURVEYING

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisite:     STAT 101

This course explores the theory and practice of surveying. Areas covered include: theory and applications of measurements and errors; linear measurements; surveying principles and instruments; leveling; angles, bearings, and azimuths; stadia measurements; traversing–field aspects; traverse computations and adjustment; topographic surveying; profiles and cross- sections; areas, volumes, and earthwork calculations; triangulation; fundamentals of surveying for building and infrastructure construction; setting out horizontal and vertical curves; setting out engineering structures and construction projects. Students acquire hands on experience with a wide variety of common surveying equipment, including use and operation of levels, theodolites, total station, and GPS.

 

EM 303         STRUCTURES I

Credits:  3 (3,1,0)           Prerequisites:   EM 203 Co-requisite: CS101, EM 204

The course looks at the factors and mechanics of building structures. Topics discussed include: equilibrium, stability, and determinacy; influence lines for beams and trusses; deflection of beams and frames by double-integration method, moment-area theorems, and conjugate beam; approximate analyses of indeterminate structures; and computer structural analysis applications.

 

 

EM 304         REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)            Prerequisites:   EM 303, EM 204                Co-requisite: EM 381

The focus of the course is understanding and working with reinforced concrete. Items covered include: behavior, analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structural members: beams, slabs, columns, and footings.

 

EM 306         SOIL MECHANICS AND FOUNDATIONS

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisites:   EM 206, EM 204                Co-requisite: EM 208

The course examines soil mechanics and foundation. Topics discussed are soil classification and index properties; soil structure and moisture; compaction; seepage; effective stress concept; compressibility and consolidation; stress and settlement analysis; shear strength; slope stability; soil stabilization methods. The class features hands-on laboratory experiments relating to important soil properties.

 

EM 315         Management of Organizations and Human Resources

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Junior Level Standing

The orientation of the course is toward developing managerial skills useful in establishing organizational personnel policy. Focus is on how effective organizational and human resource management practices can create competitive advantages for organizations. Specific topics include leadership; organizational design, structure, diversity, culture, and strategy; the role of human resources in the management process; human-resources planning and forecasting; job information systems; recruitment and selection; and human-resources development - compensation, performance evaluation, managing diversity, and expatriate management.

 

EM 317         PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)            Prerequisite:     Junior Level Standing

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of financial and managerial accounting, with an emphasis on actions managers take to more effectively address the goals of the firm. Key topics covered include the preparation and analysis of financial statements; consideration of variable and fixed costs; application of accounting information for decision- making; and analysis of budget variances, asset valuation, risk; and profitability analysis using ratios.

 

EM 326         PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Credits:  3 (3,1,0)           Prerequisites:   STAT 101, BUS 101 or EM 315

This course examines the functions and techniques for effective management of systems development and effective project leadership. Topics covered include: project definition, phases, and work breakdown; scope, risk, configuration, and quality management; cost and time estimation; and tools for planning, scheduling, monitoring and controlling of project development.

EM 327         ENGINEERING ECONOMY

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     MATH 113

The course focuses on coupling technical analysis and economic feasibility to determine the best course of action among alternatives competing for scarce resources. Areas discussed include: the principles, concepts, and methodology of the time value of money; cost-estimating techniques for engineering projects; and the ethical and social responsibilities of engineers applicable to project decisions affecting job creation and loss, personnel placement, and capital expenditure.

 

EM 335         OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Credits: 3 (3,1,0)            Prerequisite:     CS 101, STAT 101, MATH 225

This course presents resource optimization through mathematical programming. The course starts with the art of mathematical modeling for engineering and management problems. Emphasis is placed on applications of forecasting and optimization models to typical engineering management problems. Topics include problem formulation, mathematical model building, linear programming, the Simplex algorithm, duality, game theory, queuing theory, dynamic programming, and nonlinear programming. Post-optimality analysis is studied from the viewpoint of technology management. The course includes a term project involving a real-life problem.

 

EM 345         PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     STAT 101, EM 206

The course introduces students to the production planning. Topics looked at include: funda- mentals of forecasting techniques; inventory analysis; master production scheduling; material and capacity requirements; and planning and scheduling methods. Recent developments in manufacturing, Japanese manufacturing techniques, hybrid manufacturing management system are also discussed.

 

EM 346         LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT

Credits:  3 (3,0,0)           Prerequisite:     EM 335

The course surveys the fundamental analytic tools, approaches, and techniques used in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. There is a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra and inter-company logistics operations. Major topics covered are: warehousing management; transportation management; supply chain network design; management and minimization of supply chain uncertainty; and supply contracts and collaboration.

 

EM 347         QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     STAT 101

This course examines the principles and techniques of managing and improving quality in manufacturing and service facilities. Topics include quality control charts (for processes as well as raw materials and end items), continuous quality improvement tools, service quality, total quality management concept, and quality awards.

 

EM 348         FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Credits:  3 (3,0,0)           Prerequisite:     EM 345

This course looks at the basics of the facility design stages of an industrial factory. Items examined include: product, process and material handling analysis; area allocation and space analysis; flow analysis; plant layout and plan; and computerized facility layout and allocations. The course also tackles topics related to facilities and property industries, budgeting, standards, labor relations, safety, personnel administration, maintenance (exterior and interior), energy conservation, HVAC systems and space planning.

 

EM 381         CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisite:     EM 206

The course covers the composition and the physical and mechanical properties of construction materials. Construction materials surveyed include: asphalt, pavement base materials, Portland cement concrete, steel, polymers, wood, aluminum, and advanced composite materials. Proportioning of concrete mixtures including admixtures is also examined. Hands on laboratory experiments and demonstrations are used to familiarize students with testing methods, equipment, standards, and quality control procedures.

 

EM 383         BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTION

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisites:   EM 204, EM 205; Co-requisite: EM 381, CME 112

Introduces basic knowledge of building systems, materials, technical specifications, techniques, and finishing with emphasis on understanding blueprints and symbols, developing construction drawings, and installation. The course lab features field trips to fabrication plants and construction sites. The two major areas examined are structural systems, construction processes, and assemblies along with the basic mechanical and electrical systems required in buildings.

 

EM 384         CONTRACTS, SPECIFICATIONS, AND QUANTITY SURVEYING

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisites:   EM 383; Co-requisite: EM 304

The course focuses on the structure of construction documents and their interrelationships. Items covered include: means of contract procurements; standard agreements, general and particular contract conditions; construction drawings; administrative and procedural requirements for construction; and the various types of contracts relating to the construction business. Technical specifications and methods of quantity surveying are the focus of most of the lab work.

 

 

EM 408         GENERAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course introduces the main principles and recommendations of design in the following engineering fields: industrial machines design; transportation and traffic systems design; systems analysis and design; and facility systems. The last field is examined at length featuring overviews of the electrical systems and mechanical systems within a facility and their integration within the total structure.

 

EM 438         MODELING AND SIMULATION

Credits: 3 (1,0,6)            Prerequisites:   STAT 272, EM 335, EM 345

The course concentrates on simulation modeling and analysis techniques cued to their applications to production, logistics, service, and other systems. Emphasis is given to model building, application of basic statistical data analysis, and the use of simulation for design, evaluation, and improvement of such systems. Topics include; random variables and generation, discrete-event simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, formulation and solution of simple simulation models, statistical analysis of simulation output, verification, validation, and accreditation of models, selecting and fitting input distributions, simulation output analysis, and variance reduction methods. The course includes lab work and group projects.

 

EM 448         INVENTORY PLANNING AND CONTROL

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course is a specialized course on inventory planning. It builds on the materials covered in EM 346 Logistics Management. The fundamental models in this field are reviewed and readings on further situations and models – including stochastic inventory models – are examined. Case discussions and modeling projects are elements of the course as well.

 

EM 458         PRODUCT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course presents and utilizes an integrated approach to new product design, development, and launch with corporate-sponsored projects. This project-based course covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. Student teams apply the skills learned in the foundation courses to develop a new product and prototype. Team members' experience the sequential nature of formulating, evaluating, and developing a new product concept. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas, e.g. identifying customer needs, methodologies for the generation and selection of concepts, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing.

 

EM 459         MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisite:     EM 208; Senior Level Standing

The course focuses on manufacturing processes of metals, plastics and ceramics including machining and forming; plastics and powder metallurgy; and welding and casting. The course concentrates on process selection for optimum design. Laboratory experiments are associated with the lectures.

 

EM 468         INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course explores the broad range of topics related to industrial safety. Items covered include: regulations and standards; industrial hazard avoidance concepts and techniques; plant safety applications, management and its safety responsibilities; analytical trees and fault tree analysis; risk assessment, emergency planning, personal protection and first aid; and the role of information systems in safety management.

 

EM 469         HUMAN FACTORS AND WORK METHODS

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course is concerned with the design and evaluation of interaction between the users and an engineered system. It focuses on the human performance of tasks, the structure of human- system Communications, human capabilities to use system components, and the design, specification, and evaluation of interfaces. Topics discussed cover displays and controls, cognition, perception, cumulative trauma disorders and biomechanics of work; work analysis and design; methods engineering - study of the basic work measurement techniques; applications and limitations of the stop-watch time study, pre-determined motion times.

 

EM 471         TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course surveys the basic principles of managing technology and innovation in the corporate environment and the critical role technology plays as a strategic resource to achieve an organization's business objectives. The course focuses on the challenges inherent in attempting to take advantage of both incremental or routine innovation and more radical or revolutionary changes in products and processes. Topics include the evolution of technology, technology assessment, technology transfer, technology acceptance, technology lifecycle, understanding technological innovation in industry and organizational contexts, intellectual property, and the new product/service development process.

 

EM 472         KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

Knowledge Management (KM) involves the design, implementation and review of social and technological activities and processes to improve the creating, sharing and application or use of knowledge. This course examines the concept of Knowledge Management and the systems that enable people to acquire, store, distribute and process knowledge. Topics covered include: defining what knowledge is and the types of knowledge that exist; how systems thinking is integral to understanding and managing knowledge; and economic issues relating to acquiring, storing, distributing, and processing knowledge.

 

EM 473         ENERGY RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite: Senior Level Standing

This course examines the four major components of energy management: supply, demand, regulation and environment together with the concepts and principles behind successful energy management. Topics include energy auditing and economic analysis; management control and maintenance systems; sustainability and high performance green buildings; alternative energy systems; boilers and fired systems; cogeneration and HVAC systems; ground source heat pumps; lighting and electrical management; natural gas purchasing; thermal storage; codes and standards; indoor air quality; utility deregulation and energy systems outsourcing; energy security risk analysis methods; and financing energy management projects.

 

EM 474         ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

The course looks at the three types of pollution: gaseous, liquid and solid. The course goes over modern environmental measures practiced in abating pollution and wastes. Environmental assessment methods and environmental standards and regulations (both national and international) are discussed as well.

 

EM 475         TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course looks at a number of topics encompassed in the area of transportation management including: modern transportation systems, management of transportation authority, and traffic environment and safety issues.

 

EM 476         COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 (3,0,0)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

This course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of Communications systems. These analyses are used in decisions ranging from tactical planning to strategic planning. The course focuses on new approaches such as decentralized management and the management of emerging technologies. Topics covered include process analysis, quality management, security, decentralized management systems, self- configuration and self-management, policy-based management, fault management, capacity and facilities planning, models to describe and reduce congestion, and maintenance. Cases from the tele Communications industry are examined in the course.

 

EM 482         CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT AND METHODS

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisites:   EM 304, EM 306

The course covers construction equipment and methods for civil/structural facilities with emphasis on equipment-paced operations including safety aspects. Topics covered include: equipment categories; cost analysis of equipment and assembly techniques; fleet operations; powering equipment; selection and utilization of construction equipment for assorted tasks; methods for concrete and steel construction; safety and inspection requirements and task applications.

 

EM 484         CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Credits:  3 (3,0,0)           Prerequisites:   EM 384; Co-requisite: EM 482, EM 488

This course provides students with a solid understanding of the process and practice of project management of construction projects. Items covered include construction project characteristics and phases; construction job site layout; material and equipment planning and procurement; operations and processes analysis and planning; productivity and resource use considerations; performance benchmarking, measurement, analysis, enhancement, and control; safety and health practices for the construction industry; and Communications types – project logs, reports, submittals, meetings, and close out.

 

EM 486 COST ENGINEERING: ESTIMATING, BUDGETING, AND CONTROL

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisites:   EM 317, EM 327, EM 384; Co-requisite:EM 482

The course explores Cost Engineering for construction organizations, projects, and operations. Topics covered include: construction financing; break-even, profit, cash flow analyses, capital budgeting, equipment costs and procurement decisions; construction financial accounting, cost accounting, and cost control systems; cost breakdown, fixed and variable costs, direct and indirect costs, insurance and bond premiums, and overhead and markup; cost indices and conceptual estimates, parametric estimates, detailed estimates, unit price proposals, measuring work and payment determination.

 

EM 488 PROJECT PLANNING, SCHEDULING AND CONTROL

Credits: 3 (2,0,3)            Prerequisite:     Senior Level Standing

Study of the concepts used in planning, scheduling and controlling construction projects. Investigation of the planning activities for construction projects starting with Work Break Down Structure (WBS), resource, equipment and materials analysis and selection; productivity, time and cost estimates. Scheduling techniques including precedence diagrams, Critical Path Method (CPM), Program Evaluation Review Techniques (PERT), linear scheduling methods, resource leveling, time-cost analysis, bar charts, time-scaled diagrams, and computer applications (Primavera, Microsoft Project, or equivalent software); Project updating, evaluation and control, and earned value analysis.

 

EM 490         INTERNSHIP

Credits: 3     Prerequisite:           Completion of 90 credit hours

This is an eight-week professional training course in Engineering Management. The program combines classroom learning with work experience to assist students in applying their knowledge and skills to real life situations enable students to explore future quality careers in response to the evolving of local economic and workforce development needs. Students prepare and present reports on their work experience.

 

EM 492         CO-OP

Credits:  10 Prerequisite:           Completion of 90 credit hours

The PSU Co-Op Education Program combines classroom learning with work experience to assist students in applying their knowledge and skills to real life situations and building strong partnerships between the PSU and the local business community. The Co-Op enables students to pursue future quality careers that meet the needs of the local economic and workforce development.

 

EM 498 SENIOR PROJECT I

Credits: 1     Prerequisites:         ENG 301, Senior Level Standing

The course is offered in the Fall term and involves supervised projects usually done by groups of 3 students aimed at providing practical experience in industrial manufacturing and production or construction engineering management. These student groups define their projects, state their objectives, write up surveys of literature, set project specifications and select design methods.

Following preliminary modeling and analyses, the teams acquire the necessary materials needed for project completion in the Spring term. All project groups turn in professional reports and make oral presentations on their projects.

 

EM 499         SENIOR PROJECT II

Credits:  3    Prerequisite:           EM 498

This is a continuation of Project I. Project groups deliver their products that have progressed through the design, analysis, testing and evaluation stages. The project teams produce a polished professional report that describes the design process, implementation and testing, verification and validation and a critical appraisal of the project. An oral presentation and graphic works are complementary project deliverables.